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Glasgow University CADASIL Study    

The study is not recruiting - December 2013

Results Of This Study

Scientists hope that studying buttock cells could lead to a stroke breakthrough. Blood vessels of interest are found around the body – and the buttocks are much more accessible than the brain.

Glasgow University researchers believe that changes in microscopic blood vessels in the samples will shed light on what goes wrong in the brain.

While the idea may seem odd, the blood vessels of interest are found around the body – and the buttocks are much more accessible than the brain.

The study centres on a devastating inherited condition called CADASIL, in which patients suffer repeated strokes which can eventually do so much damage that they develop dementia. 

Some will suffer their first stroke in their 20s and need round-the-clock care from their 40s.

With a child of an affected parent having a 50/50 chance of developing the disease themselves, some people will be caring for a loved one while mindful that they too could fall ill at any time.

Treatment is limited to easing symptoms such as depression when they occur and doing things like stopping smoking and living healthily to reduce the risk of stroke.

The Stroke Association-funded study could also provide vital information about ‘normal’ strokes.

Researcher Keith Muir, a neurologist and stroke specialist, said: ‘CADASIL is an important problem in its own right. 

‘It causes significant disability among people who are typically quite young and is much more common than previously thought.

PUBLISHED: 22:36 EST, 27 December 2013 | UPDATED: 22:40 EST, 27 December 2013

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